4Marq Apartments

Minneapolis, MN

The 30-story, 260 unit, 4Marq occupies the last parcel available on a busy downtown block that houses two other recently built structures. The 4Marq anchors Marquette and Fourth Street.

The close proximity to the other buildings required careful planning to ensure construction would fit on a relatively tight 15,800-square-foot site, said UrbanWorks project designer David Miller. “That was a block that was instant redevelopment,” he said. “Most of the challenges were construction logistics, such as figuring out deliveries, staging the tower crane and the hoists.”

The building reused the foundation walls remaining from the parking lot that once covered the site. 4 Marq’s parking garage was placed on the seven floors above the lobby and is hidden by perforated panels. The tinted two-layer anodized panels allow air to flow in from three sides, a money-saving approach that avoids the need for expensive mechanical ventilation. Units start on the ninth floor, with half of the apartments on that level featuring balconies.

The $72.9 million project used precast construction to save time. Wells Concrete placed 476 pieces of wall panels with an acid etch finish. The horizontal stacked panels had punched openings and were supported on the CIP floor.

That show-stopping top floor “is a differentiator on this project,” Miller said. The billiards and club rooms have floor-to-ceiling windows from NanaWall that open and close. “It’s an amazing effect,” he noted.  “When you can open this entire wall you have a shared amenity of indoor space and an outdoor roof deck with the skyline as your backdrop.”


Key Design Challenges

The panels had to be large in scale for economy, but punched window openings left little room for reinforcing 14 inches of concrete top and bottom and 22 inches wide vertical legs by eight inches thick with beveled punch openings. Top, bottom and side ribs all had unique sections that made reinforcement design a challenge. Stripping, handling, and erection of these unique pieces required a finite element analysis to ensure stresses were limited to prevent any cracking. The panel also had to meet a weight limit for the tower crane.
The installation was over two major downtown roads dealing with busy city streets and erecting at night.


Innovation

The $72.9 million project used precast construction to save time, Wells Concrete placed 476 pieces of wall panels with an acid etch finish.  The horizontal stacked panels had punched openings and were supported on the CIP floor.